bonsai tree care





It’s time to feed the pines

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One of the best ways to ensure decandled pines produce strong growth in summer is to feed heavily in spring. Although people living in colder climates are just finishing the season transplantation, others have been feeding their pines for several months. If you have not yet started feeding – and you live in the northern hemisphere -. Now is the time to start

I use wet and dry fertilizers. Today I applied cotton seed meal, both in bulk and in tea bags, and fish emulsion. It would

used tea bags for all my trees but I can save time by applying dry fertilizer loose in my trees less developed.

cottonseed meal

by applying release fertilizer to the soil surface, creating small mounds with a small ball.

Applying cottonseed flour to the soil surface

After a week, the fertilizer becomes a darker color.

New fertilizer to the left, past the fertilizer right

A mixture of new and old fertilizer

Fill tea bags with fertilizer makes applying and removing the easy fertilizer. It also makes it easy to determine the amount of food a tree is receiving at a given time.

cottonseed meal in tea bags – this tree needs a few more bags

Tea bags in a healthy pine – I’ll even add more bags next week

supplement with liquid fertilizer dry fertilizer, most often fish emulsion. My goal to apply once a week during the growing season.

The application of fish emulsion

supply pine largely in the spring helps them recover from the stress of decandling. If the trees are weak or malnourished at the time decandling, I jump decandling for the year to avoid weakening the tree.

Read also:   A juniper with character

For those interested in learning about decandling first hand, I’m holding a class on the subject on June 11 at the Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt in Oakland, CA. Bring your own trees or trees provided work for your practice. See the course description for more details.

This article was originally published on bonsaitonight.com


It’s time to feed the pines

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